Remediation

Far too many students arrive on college campuses today unprepared to do university-level work. The typical solution to this problem is to place students into remedial, or developmental, courses—classes that don’t offer credit—and try to get them up to speed. Learn more about our Remediation work.

Far too many students arrive on college campuses today unprepared to do university-level work. The typical solution to this problem is to place students into remedial, or developmental, courses—classes that don’t offer credit—and try to get them up to speed. But these courses often serve as a roadblock to college success. Students can languish in remedial courses for years and never progress out; graduation rates for students who need to take at least one of these courses are much lower than for students generally. Yet instead of fixing the problem, colleges blame low-quality high schools. Our work on this issue focuses on highlighting promising programs, especially those that use technology to more precisely match content to students’ needs, that speed up remedial courses, or that do away with them entirely. Our work also emphasizes the importance of aligning state and higher education standards to ensure that students leave high school ready to do college-level work.